Basic Katakana Chart and Additionals

Similar to the hiragana chart, the katakana chart below shows the 46 basic characters together with their romaji.

The pronunciation of each katakana character is exactly the same as the equivalent hiragana character. However, katakana have more additional readings because they are used to read foreign words.

It's likely that you may get confused with the hiragana characters when learning the katakana characters. Don't worry, take your time to memorize the 46 basic characters and then continue with the 拗音 (youon).

To know what is the correct pronunciation of each katakana character, go to this "Learn how to speak Japanese with katakana audios" page.

The 46 Basic Characters

vowels
a

i

u

e

o
k-line
ka

ki

ku

ke

ko
s-line
sa

shi

su

se

so
t-line
ta

chi

tsu

te

to
n-line
na

ni

nu

ne

no
h-line
ha

hi

fu

he

ho
m-line
ma

mi

mu

me

mo
y-line
ya

yu

yo
r-line
ra

ri

ru

re

ro
w-line
wa

wo

n

濁音 (dakuon) and 半濁音 (handakuon)

Similarly, the additional katakana chart below shows those with 濁音 (dakuon) and 半濁音 (handakuon).

g-line
ga

gi

gu

ge

go
z-line
za

ji

zu

ze

zo
d-line
da

ji

zu

de

do
b-line
ba

bi

bu

be

bo
p-line
pa

pi

pu

pe

po

拗音 (youon)

Adding smaller version of ya, yu or yo (ャ, ュ, or ョ) to katakana ending in vowel i form the additional katakana chart below.

k-line キャ
kya
キュ
kyu
キョ
kyo
s-line シャ
sha
シュ
shu
ショ
sho
t-line チャ
cha
チュ
chu
チョ
cho
n-line ニャ
nya
ニュ
nyu
ニョ
nyo
h-line ヒャ
hya
ヒュ
hyu
ヒョ
hyo
m-line ミャ
mya
ミュ
myu
ミョ
myo
r-line リャ
rya
リュ
ryu
リョ
ryo

Below shows the additional katakana chart of 拗音 (youon) with 濁点 (dakuten) and 半濁点 (handakuten).

g-line ギャ
gya
ギュ
gyu
ギョ
gyo
z-line ジャ
ja
ジュ
ju
ジョ
jo
b-line ビャ
bya
ビュ
byu
ビョ
byo
p-line ピャ
pya
ピュ
pyu
ピョ
pyo

促音 (sokuon)

Similar to hiragana, when a small tsu (ッ) called 促音 (sokuon) is added, it means the following consonant is germinated or doubled. In romaji, this is represented by doubling the consonant that follows the small tsu.

For example, pet is represented in katakana as ペット (petto). The pronunciation is the same as in hiragana, after the first consonant is pronounced, pause for the amount time to pronounce the consonant, then continue to pronounce the following consonant.

Long Vowels 長音 (chouon)

For long vowels, instead of adding a second vowel as in hiragana, katakana usually uses a short line () to represent the second vowel. For examples,

Katakana Romaji Meaning
se- ta- sweater
メニュ me nyu- menu
シャワ sha wa- shower
ロビ ro bi- lobby
タクシ ta ku shi- taxi
マレシア ma re- shi a Malaysia
カレ ka re- curry

Note that long vowels in romaji is represented by a horizontal bar on top of the first vowel, just like "ō" in rōmaji. However, it is usually omitted nowadays.

For example, the correct way for Japan capital in romaji is Tōkyō, but we always write it as Tokyo. The city Kyōto is also written as Kyoto. I will not add the horizontal bar on top of the first vowel unless necessary.

Related Page

FAQ Page: What are sokuon and long vowels?

› Katakana Chart

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.

Learn to Speak Japanese Confidently & Naturally with Rocket Japanese
Learn Japanese Software

Japanese Electronic Dictionary
Electronic Dictionaries

Questions on Learning Japanese? Get them answered here...
Learn Japanese FAQ

New! Get listed in our Japanese Language School Directory
Japanese School Directory

Recent Updates



Testimonials